Category: Leaderhship

Introduction to High Performing Teams

The High Performing Teams Workshop

Overview and Design

Teams and team building are the critical concepts we cover in this half-day workshop. We offer a unique experience that illustrates the journey teams take on their way to high performance. Not many teams get there. Most give up somewhere along the way and become satisfied with OK performance that never lives up to their potential. We know from our work with hundreds of teams, this does not have to happen to your team.

Our discussion begins with illustrating the Drexler Sibbet Team Performance Model. We show the process that underlies solid team development that leads to high performance. We call our work “Immersive Facilitation.” From the very beginning of this session, we immerse the participants in a fun activity that illustrates the core issue of interdependence. The concept of interdependence is the glue that holds teams together and makes high performance possible.

We use the learning from our simulation to understand the Drexler Sibbet Team Performance Model, a unique graphic that is at once a map, a process, and vocabulary that enables team members to see where they are, where they want to be, and what they can do together to move themselves to high performance.

Our discussion begins at a high level focusing on the big picture of teams and team development. As we move through the workshop, we help participants to be able to use the model to do an assessment of their back home teams.

Team members learn the seven stages of team development as well as the keys to each stage. Improvement can begin at any stage and within any key. This new understanding gives participants a way to discuss team issues easily and productively.

Our work is strength-based and future-focused. We illustrate several practical next steps that teams can use to liven up their team, increase engagement, and align themselves with high performance.

One of the most important topics we cover is sub-grouping. All teams are made up of sub-groups. These “smaller teams” are how work actually flows through teamwork. If the sub-groups work well, the team thrives. If not, work slows down, irrelevant competition arises, and we get less than stellar results. The real secret to team building is learning how to optimize the sub-groups.

The end of our sessions always includes a check-in with all the participants about how they will apply the learning to help their own teams approach the critical choice-points necessary for moving into high performance. We have learned over many years of helping teams become extraordinary that “team issues” never resolve on their own, they must be worked.

This session is designed to be a high-value tasting session that introduces teamwork, and team development to our participants. We know from experience that real teamwork is led from everywhere. As safety develops, trust builds. Open communication and real-time feedback become norms. All of these factor into building a remarkable team. This introductory workshop illustrates the way to begin building high-performance teams. The participants leave with a new understanding of how to begin to enhance their own work team experience.

Value

Our clients receive the real value from attending and participating in this session. They consistently identify the following:

The language of team development: From the stages a team’s journey to high-performance, participants learn the keys that support each stage and the actions that can be taken to move forward. Team members take away an easy way to describe their team’s development.

A way to do an assessment of their back home team. By learning the model and some actions that can be used on their own teams, participants learn how to assess their own team.

The power of sub-teams within a team. This little-known secret to team development creates a new understanding of “group dynamics,” making course corrections easier to understand.

The importance of feedback and openness to teams. Building trust and creating space for team members to say what needs to be said.

The importance of team membership. Real teams can be led from anywhere. Heating up team membership and getting ownership of results is a team responsibility.

• Introduction to additional resources. Access to a wide variety of additional readings, workshops, graphic templates, all time-tested, are presented as choices for optional follow-up.

Costs and Materials

Please call us for pricing.

 

Take a Knee

I have always enjoyed watching Colin Kaepernick play. He plays with abandon, exhorting his team mates, taking risks, and showing the courage to stand his ground and take the hits that sometimes come from making a play. I’m just a fan, an emotional one I will admit, and it gives me pause to see him treated with disdain by so many.

Now it’s a different game for Mr. Kaepernick. He has taken a knee. He declared that kneeling in silence while everyone else stands for our national anthem is his way of saying ENOUGH! Our police unjustly kill people of color, and I have to do something to call attention to it. Every time he does it, or others join him, it affects us. By taking a knee, he has used the power of silence combined with the visible sign of resistance. “I will no longer participate in this,” he says so powerfully. It reminds us that the reason for taking the knee is ongoing. The problem remains, and deep inside us, I believe we know that his cause is just.

So many of my friends ( I am an elder white male) chide me for taking Mr. Kapernick’s side. They get upset when they see him take the knee. “He won’t stand for our Anthem” is the most common thing they say, And in their logic, he deserves punishment for doing so. When I posted my support on facebook, I got no “likes” and no “comments.”

Anytime someone raises the “undiscussable” they can expect to get push back from their group. They break the norm, (the undiscussed way of acting in a given situation. If you want to experience this for yourself in a safe way, face the back of the elevator next time you are in one, and you will experience what it’s like when people shun you (in a light way.)

The question I have learned to ask when I get challenged about my support for Mr. Kaepernick is, “When would you take a knee? What circumstances would have to exist for you to decide to take a knee in a stadium? What about at work? Have you ever taken a knee for something you believe in? Can you give me an example? These are great conversation starters. I mean it. Try them out. And the stories will lead to new insights about your friends.

Acting ethically is fundamental to business. The executives at Enron did not take a knee, and they were known as the brightest around. The executives at Volkswagon didn’t take a knee, and neither did the executives at Wells Fargo. Arthur Andersen is no longer around. The Challenger exploded because no one dared to take a knee.

And it’s one I have had to answer for myself. I have taken a knee, and because of doing so I launched my consulting career thirty years ago. When I reported my boss for sexually harassing my reports, I got the visit from HR. It hurt. I remember going home to my wife and saying, “I am going to be a consultant now. You will have to keep us afloat until I get enough business.” We survived, and we never looked back. Now I get paid well for telling people the truth.

Going along and not speaking up causes so much pain in the long run. We all need to learn how to stop a group process at times. It’s one of the real ways to innovate. Mr. Kaepernick proves this point. I respect your opinion about his action but at least admit that he does not deserve punishment for calling out attention to a real problem. And I will not be watching this season until Mr. Kaepernick gets a job offer. I want to see him play again and deep down I believe you do too.